PEACE FINGERS T SHIRT - PEACE FINGERS


PEACE FINGERS T SHIRT - BASKETBALL T SHIRT DESIGNS - I HEART RUDY FERNANDEZ T SHIRT.



Peace Fingers T Shirt





peace fingers t shirt






    t shirt
  • A short-sleeved casual top, generally made of cotton, having the shape of a T when spread out flat

  • jersey: a close-fitting pullover shirt

  • A T-shirt (T shirt or tee) is a shirt which is pulled on over the head to cover most of a person's torso. A T-shirt is usually buttonless and collarless, with a round neck and short sleeves.

  • T Shirt is a 1976 album by Loudon Wainwright III. Unlike his earlier records, this (and the subsequent 'Final Exam') saw Wainwright adopt a full blown rock band (Slowtrain) - though there are acoustic songs on T-Shirt, including a talking blues.





    fingers
  • (finger) feel or handle with the fingers; "finger the binding of the book"

  • (finger) any of the terminal members of the hand (sometimes excepting the thumb); "her fingers were long and thin"

  • (finger) the length of breadth of a finger used as a linear measure

  • A measure of liquor in a glass, based on the breadth of a finger

  • A part of a glove intended to cover a finger

  • Each of the four slender jointed parts attached to either hand (or five, if the thumb is included)





    peace
  • the absence of mental stress or anxiety

  • Mental calm; serenity

  • the state prevailing during the absence of war

  • Freedom from disturbance; quiet and tranquility

  • Freedom from or the cessation of war or violence

  • harmonious relations; freedom from disputes; "the roommates lived in peace together"











peace fingers t shirt - Fingers




Fingers


Fingers



Harvey Keitel plays a piano virtuoso with a twisted second job - he's the muscle man who 'collects' on his mob father's debts. Of course, this creates an internal struggle between the artist's commitments to his father and his love of music.

The debut film for director-writer James Toback has developed a cult following over the years but was one of three 1978 films that put a damper on Harvey Keitel's career for more than a decade. In this overheated brew of testosterone and male sensitivity, Keitel plays the son of a fading mob boss; Dad forces him to work as a leg-breaker collecting bad debts while Mom wants him to pursue a career as a classical pianist. Isn't this how Van Cliburn got his start? Keitel rides an emotional roller coaster, torn between parental poles even as he faces the audition that could launch him on the concert circuit. Oh, and for good measure, he starts to suffer doubts about his own manhood, thanks to an encounter with ex-footballer Jim Brown. Strictly for Toback and Keitel aficionados. --Marshall Fine










77% (12)





Stiff Little Fingers at Massive Attack's Meltdown 2008




Stiff Little Fingers at Massive Attack's Meltdown 2008





Ian McCallum - Rythym guitarist and Steve Grantley - drummer

At Massive Attack's Meltdown 2008, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, Stiff Little Fingers performed their 1979 debut 'Inflammable Material' in its entirety - and were just fantastic!

The bouncers at the Festival Hall were very hot trying to stop people taking photographs - I have a large camera which was going to be very visible, but risked taking a few shots - these are snatched rather than composed but maybe capture the amazing atmosphere!


Belfast-based punk band formed in 1977, currently featuring Jake Burns - vocals, guitar, Ian McCallum - guitar, vocals, Ali McMordie - bass guitar, vocals and Steve Grantley - drums, vocals

Review from Musicomh.com;

Stiff Little Fingers @ Royal Festival Hall, London, 18 July 2008

For a band that celebrated its 30th anniversary last year, Stiff Little Fingers are in very good nick. Their energetic 90-minute set at the Royal Festival Hall, as part of this year's Meltdown Festival curated by Massive Attack, showed they are still kicking against the pricks with some force.

The Belfast boys, led by the diminutive but charismatic Jake Burns, made their name as a punk-pop band whose aggressively melodic music was matched by some hard-hitting lyrics about life during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Their contemporaneous compatriots The Undertones may have enjoyed bigger commercial success with their infectious tunes about teenage kicks but SLF have always been a more political band.

Apart from their anti-partisan stance, SLF have been strong champions against racism. However, they have never been po-faced posturers: their music is passionate and unpretentious, not particularly subtle but exhilarating when played with full commitment. No frills, but plenty of thrills.

Their best material may have come out of the New Wave in the late 70s/early 80s, but after a five-year break SLF re-formed in 1987, since when they've released five albums with changing line-ups (including at one point ex-Jam Bruce Foxton on bass), Burns being the only original member left. Without troubling the general public's attention very much, the band has retained its hardcore fan-base - many of whom, with middle-aged beer bellies swelling beneath their SLF T-shirts, were present at the South Bank venue.

After acknowledging the cheers with 'This is fucking posh isn't it?', Burns and his band launch into At the Edge, a song seething with desire to escape from a claustrophobic dead-end urban existence. No Surrender, originally written as a condemnation of the first Gulf War, is now applied to the current war in Iraq, with Burns attacking 'both bastard Bushes'. Harp is the only song which has an Irish folk feel to it, with its spirited response to anti-Irishness, while Strummerville is a tribute to the Clash frontman.

According to Burns, the more soulful Silver Lining is the 'closest thing I've written to Motown'.

Although starting with these later songs, most of the evening is devoted to playing all 13 tracks from their debut 1979 album Inflammable Material - for the last time, apparently. And it's still fiery stuff. It is mainly about the experience of being raised in an atmosphere of tribal conflict passed down from generations in Northern Ireland - but although the situation has now blessedly been transformed into peace, the songs still stand up strongly.

The band's first single Suspect Device is still an explosive rejection of the bombing campaigns of paramilitary organizations, while State of Emergency is a powerful indictment of bigotry. Here We Are Nowhere is a one-minute song of teenage frustration about nothing to do on a Friday night. Wasted Life - 'I won't be a soldier/I won't take no orders from no one' - asserts individual identity, and Barbed Wire - 'Love I met you in No Man's Land/Across the wire we were holding hands' - is a bittersweet love song. Rough Trade is a bitter reaction to being 'betrayed' by the eponymous record company who withdrew their promised contract. There's a rousing performance of Johnny Was, an eight-minute Bob Marley song, where punk meets reggae on equal footing. And the plea for a fresh start in Alternative Ulster still comes across urgently.
SLF go off stage after performing one of their best-loved songs - the self-empowering Nobody's Hero - to rapturous applause, but come back for an encore of a cover version of The Specials' Doesn't Make It All Right, featured on SLF's second album. The audience want more but one and a half hours at full throttle is not bad going for a bunch of fifty-year-olds.

- Neil Dowden











Stiff Little Fingers at Massive Attack's Meltdown 2008




Stiff Little Fingers at Massive Attack's Meltdown 2008





Ali McMordie - Bass guitarist never stood still for a second!

At Massive Attack's Meltdown 2008, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, Stiff Little Fingers performed their 1979 debut 'Inflammable Material' in its entirety - and were just fantastic!

The bouncers at the Festival Hall were very hot trying to stop people taking photographs - I have a large camera which was going to be very visible, but risked taking a few shots - these are snatched rather than composed but maybe capture the amazing atmosphere!

Belfast-based punk band formed in 1977, currently featuring Jake Burns - vocals, guitar, Ian McCallum - guitar, vocals, Ali McMordie - bass guitar, vocals and Steve Grantley - drums, vocals

Review from Musicomh.com;

Stiff Little Fingers @ Royal Festival Hall, London, 18 July 2008

For a band that celebrated its 30th anniversary last year, Stiff Little Fingers are in very good nick. Their energetic 90-minute set at the Royal Festival Hall, as part of this year's Meltdown Festival curated by Massive Attack, showed they are still kicking against the pricks with some force.

The Belfast boys, led by the diminutive but charismatic Jake Burns, made their name as a punk-pop band whose aggressively melodic music was matched by some hard-hitting lyrics about life during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Their contemporaneous compatriots The Undertones may have enjoyed bigger commercial success with their infectious tunes about teenage kicks but SLF have always been a more political band.

Apart from their anti-partisan stance, SLF have been strong champions against racism. However, they have never been po-faced posturers: their music is passionate and unpretentious, not particularly subtle but exhilarating when played with full commitment. No frills, but plenty of thrills.

Their best material may have come out of the New Wave in the late 70s/early 80s, but after a five-year break SLF re-formed in 1987, since when they've released five albums with changing line-ups (including at one point ex-Jam Bruce Foxton on bass), Burns being the only original member left. Without troubling the general public's attention very much, the band has retained its hardcore fan-base - many of whom, with middle-aged beer bellies swelling beneath their SLF T-shirts, were present at the South Bank venue.

After acknowledging the cheers with 'This is fucking posh isn't it?', Burns and his band launch into At the Edge, a song seething with desire to escape from a claustrophobic dead-end urban existence. No Surrender, originally written as a condemnation of the first Gulf War, is now applied to the current war in Iraq, with Burns attacking 'both bastard Bushes'. Harp is the only song which has an Irish folk feel to it, with its spirited response to anti-Irishness, while Strummerville is a tribute to the Clash frontman.

According to Burns, the more soulful Silver Lining is the 'closest thing I've written to Motown'.

Although starting with these later songs, most of the evening is devoted to playing all 13 tracks from their debut 1979 album Inflammable Material - for the last time, apparently. And it's still fiery stuff. It is mainly about the experience of being raised in an atmosphere of tribal conflict passed down from generations in Northern Ireland - but although the situation has now blessedly been transformed into peace, the songs still stand up strongly.

The band's first single Suspect Device is still an explosive rejection of the bombing campaigns of paramilitary organizations, while State of Emergency is a powerful indictment of bigotry. Here We Are Nowhere is a one-minute song of teenage frustration about nothing to do on a Friday night. Wasted Life - 'I won't be a soldier/I won't take no orders from no one' - asserts individual identity, and Barbed Wire - 'Love I met you in No Man's Land/Across the wire we were holding hands' - is a bittersweet love song. Rough Trade is a bitter reaction to being 'betrayed' by the eponymous record company who withdrew their promised contract. There's a rousing performance of Johnny Was, an eight-minute Bob Marley song, where punk meets reggae on equal footing. And the plea for a fresh start in Alternative Ulster still comes across urgently.
SLF go off stage after performing one of their best-loved songs - the self-empowering Nobody's Hero - to rapturous applause, but come back for an encore of a cover version of The Specials' Doesn't Make It All Right, featured on SLF's second album. The audience want more but one and a half hours at full throttle is not bad going for a bunch of fifty-year-olds.

- Neil Dowden









peace fingers t shirt








peace fingers t shirt




The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T






5000 FINGERS OF DR. T - DVD Movie

Bart: I don't think the piano is my instrument.
Dr. Terwilliker: What other instruments are there, pray tell? Scratchy violins, screechy piccolos, nauseating trumpets, et cetera, et cetera?
The only live-action Dr. Seuss movie for nearly a half-century, this delightful musical comedy is a treat--something for kids who thought they have seen everything. Young Bart (Tommy Rettig of TV's Lassie) detests his piano lessons with the fanatical Dr. Terwilliker (Hans Conried). As with Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, Bart falls into a dream world in which the piano teacher--renamed Dr. T--is ruler and children are hunted down to have piano lessons. Worse yet, Dr. T has magical control over Bart's mom (Mary Healy). The Oscar-nominated songs are uneven but the art direction is superb, creating a truly magical world (and the world's longest piano). Dr. Seuss's love for language stays intact. Many kids of the 1950s might remember Bart's five-fingered beanie, which was a top seller. Great fun for the 5-10 age range, and adults too. --Doug Thomas










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